The Window Sill

March 16, 2018 - 4 Responses

This is the inside of my kitchen window sill which has a view of my back garden.

I like collecting bottles with interesting labels especially if there are birds or animals featured.

The jar in the middle is an old preserving jar which has been filled with objects I have scavenged on my wanderings.




My aunts used to buy my grandfather jars of ginger.  The green one is my favourite.


This is the outside of my kitchen window sill which gives a view of my kitchen. I established the array of potted succulents so my cat, Belle, couldn’t sit on the sill and make holes in the flywire screen – very annoying.

I was intrigued by the reflections in the window as they blurred the boundaries between inside and outside.


An old plastic jug makes an ideal plant container. I used a heated knife to make holes in the bottom for drainage.

A friend used her drill to make drainage holes in this enamel pot.



My Evolving Garden

March 6, 2018 - 13 Responses

In April, I will have lived in Castlemaine for 5 years. During that time, I have been creating a potted garden on my front verandah. My house faces north which means it gets plenty of light especially in winter when the sun is low enough for the light to stream in.

This (above) is how one end of the verandah looked about four years ago and this (below) is how it looks now.


The verandah is great for frost tender plants especially frost tender succulents. The burnt leaves belong to a bromeliad which I needed to move from the edge of the verandah to the back where it will be nice and warm in winter.

I have an old, wooden step ladder leaning against the wall. The steps are shelves for smaller pots.




A large, shallow, terracotta bowl contains cones, seed pods, shells and rocks. Overwrought in Blampied made the small crab and large spider.

The garden extends to the window sill where there are cacti, succulents, feathers and rocks.





Stone Cottage, Specimen Gully, Barkers Creek

February 22, 2018 - 6 Responses

This is my interpretation of the stone cottage near the place in Specimen Gully where gold was first discovered in the Mount Alexander district.

I found making this charcoal drawing quite challenging as the cottage wouldn’t fit on the A4 page. I also found depicting the texture of the stonewalls difficult.

I found my eye kept being drawn to the trees which surrounded the cottage so I paid a bit of attention to them.





Specimen Gully, Barkers Creek

February 16, 2018 - 6 Responses

The discovery of gold in 1851 resulted in the gold rush to the Mount Alexander gold fields.

This cairn was erected near the site of the discovery of gold by three shepherds and a bullock driver. Specimen Gully was on land owned by Dr. William Barker who ran sheep on a large property since the early 1840s.

On the site is an old, crumbling cottage which was once the home of the John Worley mentioned on the plaque.

Bella Donna lilies dot the goldfields where there were once gardens. There are a number of these hardy survivors around the cottage. As you can see, neither rich garden soil nor regular watering are required for showy blooms.

The cottage and the cairn were built of locally mined slate. The cottage was extended at least once.

These ‘looking through’ shots are for you, Enivea.


Grampians Series No. 3

February 7, 2018 - 8 Responses

Here is another collage created using monoprints I made during the Grampians Brushes 2017 workshop I attended in September last year.

I had made monoprints of gum leaves at the workshop.

For this collage, I did a lot of cutting up and cutting out. I stuck down some of the printed paper to make a background layer. I cut out the prints of the leaves and drew around them to create leaf shapes on a variety of hand painted and printed papers I had in my stash. I cut out the leaf shapes and stuck them down in another couple of layers. For the top layer, I added the monoprints and some feathers. I coloured any white spaces left with wax crayon. I felt the collage needed a point of focus so I added the sequins to complete the work.


Australia Day 2018

January 26, 2018 - 6 Responses

Today I participated in local Australia Day festivities.

Australia Day is celebrated on the 26th of January as Australia’s National Day. It marks the anniversary of the arrival of the First Fleet in 1788. The fleet of 11 British ships with their cargo of convicts who had been sentenced for their crimes to transportation landed at Port Jackson, New South Wales where a settlement was established at Sydney Cove.

Currently the day is celebrated with community and family events, official community awards and citizenship ceremonies.

However, the date of Australia’s national day is not without its controversy. For a proportion of indigenous Australians and their supporters the 26th of January is a day of mourning and is referred to as Invasion Day or Survival Day. So in addition to celebrations, there are protests and marches in the capital cities.

The choice of the 26th of January as Australia’s national day is becoming increasingly controversial with some municipal councils now refusing to organise celebrations or conduct citizenship ceremonies on that day much to the displeasure of the Federal Government.

However, the Shires of Mount Alexander and Macedon Ranges do celebrate Australia Day and actively seek to include local indigenous people in the day.


A friend and I set off for Malmsbury for breakfast organised by a local community organisation.

The atmosphere in the Malmsbury Botanic Gardens was very relaxed.


Andy Rigby and Pollie Christie provided the musical entertainment.


A novel car sticker spotted in the carpark.

We moved on to Victory Park, Castlemaine for lunch and joined the queue.

Here are some stragglers being served by members of the Castlemaine Football Netball Club.


My friend, Marie, is relaxing after cooking lunch with other members of the local Lion’s club. They catered for 700 people.

George and Eliza were deep in conversation by the fruit stand.

The event is supported by Nalderun, the Upper Loddon Indigenous group. Vic Say, a leader of the local Reconciliation group, was helping out at the stand.

Eliza Tree, a local artist, and her dog were enjoying the day.

And here am I decked out in a T shirt with a design by an aboriginal artist and my wombat earrings.


Grampians Series No. 2

January 20, 2018 - 3 Responses

This is the second collage I have completed using mono prints I made at Grampians Brushes in September 2017.

I cut holes in the printed mesh and stuck coloured paper then the mesh onto the printed background.

Using wax crayon, I added colour to the printed shapes which were also stuck onto the background.

Finally, I glued on nylon ribbon, pink plastic mesh and a crocheted flower to complete the collage.


Grampians Series No.1

January 8, 2018 - 4 Responses

On the 9th and 10th of September 2017, I attended an arts workshop in Halls Gap, the main centre for tourism in the Grampians.

The workshop, ‘Monoprinting with Collage’, was held as part of the Grampians Brushes program organised by GrampianArts.

I was attracted to the workshop because I like making collages and I wanted to learn more about printing techniques as I hadn’t tried monoprinting before.

The tutor was artist and printmaker, Mandy Gunn who presented a stimulating schedule of print making activities.

Printing presses were available and I was excited by the intensity of colour and the fine detail which could be achieved by using them.  However, I stuck with handprinting as I wanted to experiment to see what worked best using this method of printing. I am a kitchen table artist – my ‘studio’ is an old laminex kitchen table which sits at one end of my living room. I like to use inexpensive, low tech processes to make my art.

I came home with a collection of prints which I could use to incorporate into artwork, including collages, at a later date.

With the arrival of January and a break from my regular weekly schedule, I have now adopted my summer routine when I spend the hot afternoons in the cool of the indoors –  a perfect time to get out the prints I made in September and start making new art pieces.

This is the first collage I made.


View Across Guildford

December 31, 2017 - 4 Responses

It was a lovely spring day when I set up at the gate of the pony club to draw this view across Guildford. I sat in dappled shade as I drank in the view of Guildford dreaming in the bright sunshine.

I was finishing the drawing when members of the pony club started arriving with their horsefloats and began unloading their horses.

When I was photographing the drawing outside in the shade of a tree, the flash went off in the top photograph whilst no flash fired in the bottom photograph. I included both photographs as I was intrigued by how different the drawing looked in the second photograph which has a bluish tinge.





Old Timer, Dunkeld 2017

December 22, 2017 - 7 Responses

My holiday accommodation during my visit to the Southern Grampians in September was the Southern Grampians Cottages.

The log cabin style cottages are set in spacious, attractive gardens.

 The view from the front windows of my cottage was dominated by this magnificent, old river red gum.


I thoroughly enjoyed my stay at the Southern Grampians Cottages in Dunkeld. I particularly enjoyed the small flock of chooks which free ranged around the front gardens……..and I got to take home some of their eggs.