Charcoal View of the Barkers Creek Viaduct

October 19, 2017 - 10 Responses

 

When I was out admiring the Barkers Creek Viaduct near Harcourt, I enriched the experience by making this charcoal drawing.

I find whilst I am drawing, the saying that the more you look, the more you see is very true.

It was very pleasant sitting in the sun whilst communing with the viaduct.

 

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Lambley Nursery, near Creswick

October 9, 2017 - 8 Responses

Lambley Nursery near Creswick is a great destination for garden lovers. It has extensive display gardens which are a joy to wander through.

Lambley specialises in more unusual exotics especially those suited to hot, dry climates.

A friend and I visited Lambley yesterday, Sunday, on a mild October day. The avenue of blossom trees which line the front driveway are at their snowy best.

 

 

Lambley is situated in open farming country where there is rich volcanic soil. Being at a higher altitude to Castlemaine, the temperatures are generally cooler and the climate damper. The display gardens are surrounded by protective high hedges.

These are views inside the drought tolerant garden where little supplementary watering is done.

 

These are some of the inhabitants of the drought tolerant garden.

 

These plants are growing in other display areas.

If you don’t like tulips, scroll down to the final photo now. On the day, the tulips were the real show stoppers. Here are some examples in all their colourful glory.

The tulips were interplanted with wall flowers, so not only were there gorgeous colours but delightful, sweet perfume as well.

 

 

After all that colour, there is this quiet green avenue to give the eyes some rest.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barkers Creek Viaduct, Harcourt

October 2, 2017 - 2 Responses

One of the local landmarks in Harcourt is this viaduct over Barkers Creek. Like its much grander cousin in Malmsbury, it was built in 1859 to 1860 as part of the construction of the railway between Melbourne and the Murray River – a significant piece of nation building at the time.

The viaduct was built of granite quarried from nearby Mount Alexander. German stonemasons constructed the viaduct which is typical of the Victorian era when there was great pride in public infrastructure. The viaduct shows fine design and craftsmanship. It has a simple beauty.

This is how the viaduct looked when it was first built. I didn’t realise at first that there is a man lying on the grass.

I didn’t realise Katie is in this photograph until I uploaded it.

Like the one at Malmsbury, the Barkers Creek viaduct is in active service with trains travelling across it at regular intervals on their journeys between Melbourne, Bendigo and Echuca.

The early photograph is from the collection at the State Library. The photographer was from Morris, Alfred and Co. 1860.

Grampians View

September 26, 2017 - 4 Responses

After ambling up The Piccaninny in the morning, I drove to a dirt road between the Dunkeld racecourse and the cemetery where I could obtain fine views of Mount Abrupt and Mount Sturgeon. I was treated to local kangaroos hopping between the racecourse and cemetery.

Mount Abrupt was partially obscured by drifting smoke so I turned my attention to Mount Sturgeon. Because there was a stiff breeze, I sheltered in the car whilst I made this crayon drawing.

The Southern Grampians

September 18, 2017 - 10 Responses

Recently, I travelled to Dunkeld situated at the southern end of the Grampians National Park (Gariwerd) for a week’s holiday. The Grampians, especially the northern part of the national park, are a popular destination for holiday makers.

Dunkeld is a small township dominated by three peaks – Mount Sturgeon, Mount Abrupt and The Piccaninny. As its name implies, The Piccaninny is the smallest of the three peaks and has a walking trail graded as easy.

Here are two views looking out across the Grampians which I admired as I ambled up the Piccaninny on Monday, the 11th of September.

 

I was attracted by the different colours on this rock during my walk.

 

Tuesday, the 12th of September, was wet in the morning but cleared in the afternoon, so I could take a walk from my accommodation to the Dunkeld park.  The park includes an arboretum, reservoir and an old timber mill.

 

 

 

The park boasted this wonderful, old red river gum.

 

I was intrigued by the ornate portico of the Dunkeld Post Office building. However, the bright sunshine of Wednesday morning had turned to deluges of rain by the time I drove to Cavendish, another small township in the district.

This bovine beauty is located outside the cafe where I had lunch in Cavendish.

The Malmsbury Viaduct – Now and Then

September 6, 2017 - 6 Responses

I have been trawling through the digital images held by the State Library of Victoria searching for early photographs relating to posts I have published previously.

In 2016, I published a post about the Malmsbury viaduct which was completed in 1860 as part of the railway construction linking Melbourne to Echuca on the Murray River. The solidly constructed bluestone bridge crossing the Coliban River has stood the test of time and looks as good as new.

This old photograph was taken by Alfred Morris and Co. in the 1860s.

The rawness of the cleared countryside is now days softened by the mature trees in the background and the plantings in the Malmsbury Botanic Gardens in the foreground.

 

 

 

Proteas

August 28, 2017 - 7 Responses

The vase of proteas which featured in my last post made their way onto a table in my living room to model for this drawing. I used wax crayon for the drawing.

I like to buy proteas at Wesley Hill Market. They make a great cut flower as they are long lasting and I like the shapes of the blooms and leaves.

Tempting Hints of Spring

August 13, 2017 - 9 Responses

It is August and it is still winter. We have had some bitterly cold weather this past week – bitterly cold by our standards that is! However, August has also been tempting us with some early spring days when it is warm enough to shed a layer or two.

Today was one such day. Katie and I went for a long walk this morning in the bush where we were able to admire the bright yellow wattle in full bloom.

This afternoon when I was doing some house cleaning – eeekkk!, I was attracted by the sight of sunshine streaming in through the north facing window of my bedroom and the pattern of light and shadow created on objects and the wall.

 

Today was a good day.

In Among The Wool

August 9, 2017 - 4 Responses

This collage is inspired by the Australian Sheep and Wool Show which is held annually in Bendigo in July.

The Sheep Show has been running since 1877 to showcase Australia’s top wool growers and prime lamb producers.

The promoters of the three day event in its modern form, bill the show as ‘the largest event of its type in the world.’ Whatever the truth of that claim is, it is undeniable that at the show, wool is king and merino rams are lords.

In addition to sheep bred for wool, there was a large area devoted to prime lamb breeds. Dorper lambs are so appealing especially when they are wearing small coats to keep warm.

It is possible to attend the Australian Sheep and Wool Show and not look at a sheep. The many wool craft sheds are thronged with people who have a passion for fashion and the fibre crafts – spinning, weaving, dying, knitting, crocheting and felting.

This year’s show had the added bonus of being the venue for the National Yard Dog Championships so it was kelpie heaven. I found it exciting to watch the kelpies herding sheep through a course of enclosures, gates and ramps under the direction of their handlers.

I spent most of my time in the sheep sheds where I was easily entertained. I was amused watching the rams being taken to their appointed spots for judging as some had no intention of going quietly. Some roared as their owners held them firmly under their chins as they awaited the judges. Young owners lining up roughly 20 lambs for judging was a hoot. It was heartening to see so many young people training to be farmers.

I especially admired the coloured sheep with their long ringlets. Some were tame and were happy to accept pats from admirers.

 

By the River

July 27, 2017 - 11 Responses

I am working on a new collage which is still to be finished, so I trawled through photographs of former holidays. I thought you might like these shots of river scenes taken in 2009 when I journeyed to Cobram and Numurkah in northern Victoria.

 

This is the Murray River near Cobram.

River Red Gums are typical of the adjoining flood plain.

Broken Creek wanders through Numurkah.

 

 

 

More River Red Gums. They can grow to enormous spreading trees. They need a good, flooding soaking from time to time to thrive.