Archive for September, 2018

Poverty Gully Garden, Castlemaine
September 24, 2018

Today was perfect for visiting an open garden.

Gardens of the HEDGE (Horticultural Endeavours Demonstrating Gardening Enthusiasm) have six gardens open during the period 22nd September until 7th October.

Poverty Gully Garden is in an attractive bushland setting on the edge of Castlemaine. The gardener has successfully created a garden where the challenges include poor soil, drought, severe frosts and wild life which likes to drop in for a snack. Kangaroos, wallabies, possums and hares are common on the bushland property.

If you look beyond the potted plants to the low embankment, you will see what passes for soil in Castlemaine. Yet undeterred, local gardeners rise to the challenge of creating diverse and interesting gardens.

Here are some of the views from the garden to the adjoining bushland.

The house, fencing and retaining walls are built of stone.

The gardener said there was a lot of trial and error in finding which plants would survive the demanding conditions. Her garden features plants which are bullet proof.

Native plants are used extensively throughout the garden.

The wattles are in full bloom at present.

Succulents also take pride of place.

The gardener has used succulents decoratively by inserting pieces into these old bed springs and…..

……..creating this wreath.

Pieces which survive until the 7th of October will be planted out into the garden.

Potted plants add interest to the garden as well as ………

……….the colourful mosaic work.

These pebble mosaics add great texture.

This verandah provides the right conditions ………

………for these plants to thrive.

Finally, a get-away for the grandchildren.

 

 

Winter Sun, Kyneton
September 16, 2018

Winter Sun was the second garden I visited on Saturday, the 8th of September. It stood out like a ray of sunshine amidst light industry and neighbouring residential properties with drab gardens.

In early spring, the garden is dominated by daffodils – big, yellow daffodils. They are in the driveway, ……

…….the front garden and………

 

……the back garden.

 

I was able to admire the blossom of a tree overhanging from a neighbour’s yard.

The gardener has this quirky collection of birds displayed on an outdoor heater……

……..and this impressive display of motoring signs in his garage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hedgerow Cottage, Kyneton
September 8, 2018

Today marked the first of my open garden visits since autumn.

Open gardens are one of the many attractions of the Kyneton Daffodil and Arts Festival. Last weekend was too cold and miserable to visit any gardens, but today, Saturday, was much fairer.

I visited two gardens in town. The first garden I visited was Hedgerow Cottage.

Apart from some well established trees from a much earlier garden, the current one has been developed over the past six years.

There is a small, front garden and……..

……… a much larger back garden. It is early spring so the deciduous trees, apart from a weeping willow, are not in leaf yet.

It would be lovely and cool sitting under the shade of the ash tree in summer.

White, purple and these pink violets are a feature of the garden at present.

The back garden is fragrant with the perfume of daphne bushes.

A daffodil festival needs daffodils.

I admired this grouping of pots. Box balls are dotted throughout the garden both in pots and planted in the ground.

This pretty collection of potted plants is situated at the back of the house.