Archive for the ‘Vaughan’ Category

The Vaughan – Tarilta Road Bridge
June 1, 2015

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 This post illustrates one of the unexpected drawbacks of rural living. The Vaughan – Tarilta Bridge crosses the Loddon River providing access for a small number of Vaughan residents to the main sealed road which connects Vaughan to nearby Fryers Town, Guildford and Castlemaine.

The bridge was closed in September 2012 after it fell into disrepair thus isolating residents from reliable access to the main road. The residents rely on a ford across the Loddon River used by emergency vehicles. This works only whilst the Loddon is dry. The residents’ other option is to drive along a gravel road to the main road via the tiny settlement of Tarilta. The gravel road passes through a farm property complete with free ranging geese and cows.

Residents were understandably upset when earlier this year, the Mt. Alexander Shire Council announced the kerbside waste and recycling collection services were being withdrawn because the bridge was impassable. The council expected the affected residents to take their waste to the transfer stations at Castlemaine or Maldon where a fee is charged or engage a private waste contractor. There was no mention of a reduction in the council rates payable by the residents – Grrrr!

The local press has documented the ongoing saga of attempts by council and local politicians to find funding so the Vaughan – Tarilta Bridge can be rebuilt.

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Some one is making a point through this informal art installation about the ongoing closure of the bridge.

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An Autumn Afternoon in Vaughan
May 14, 2015

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 The last few days have been very wintry – cold, grey with fitful sun and biting winds.

So, I am cheering myself up with publishing this post about a visit to Vaughan on a beautiful, warm autumn day on Friday, the 1st of May.

The township of Vaughan is situated on the junction of the Loddon River and Fryers Creek which have carved a narrow, steep valley.

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 The bush at the top of the valley.

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Looking across the valley to the rocky slope opposite.

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 The Vaughan Springs Reserve lies at the bottom of the valley. The mineral springs have attracted day visitors for many years. The reserve has seen better days when it was more popular with visitors but the giant slide has been maintained and the plantings of exotic trees supplemented with newer plantings.

The trees glowed with autumn colour in the bright sun.

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 I didn’t have time to draw that afternoon so I picked some leaves and made this pastel drawing  later.

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The Distance Between You and Me – Jessie Stanley
March 19, 2015

The  Castlemaine State Festival is in full swing.  This festival sets the town abuzz every two years with an array of theatre, story, dance, music, film and the visual arts offered.

Which brings me to the subject of this post – Jessie Stanley’s artwork, The Distance Between You and Me, which is described in the Festival program as …..’a series of interactive and contemporary sculptural artworks throughout the historical township of Vaughan.’

Actually, this post began some weeks ago when I picked up a postcard in the Visitor Information Centre advertising a series of workshops where community members would be taught how to fold shapes to make star flowers which would be used to create an interstellar cloud in the Vaughan Cemetery. ‘You beauty,’ I thought,  A chance to get involved in the Festival in some small way.’ So off I went to the final two hour workshop at the public hall in Guildford where I struggled for an hour before successfully making my first star flower. By the end of the workshop, I felt confident enough to take some shapes home to make more star flowers.

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This was the result of my efforts. Seven more star flowers to be added to the interstellar cloud.

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On Tuesday, the 17th of March, I decided it was time to go out to Vaughan to view the completed art work. The art work celebrates the life and times of  George and Matilda Rogers (Jessie Stanley’s forebears) who lived in Vaughan in the gold rush era when many thousands lived in the area. The art work also explores the town’s relationship with water including its mineral springs. Vaughan is now a small township nestled in bushland which has regrown since gold mining ceased.

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The first step of the journey was to pick up a map created by Jessie Stanley from the kiosk in the mineral springs reserve.

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 The next step was to rest on the George Rogers memorial seat to study the map.

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 Then a refreshing drink at one of the mineral springs.

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 Leaving the mineral springs reserve, the journey took us to the former site of the ginger beer factory owned by Jessie Stanley’s ancestor. A rather bewildered Katie is tethered to the sculpture on the site of the old well.

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 Well, I opened the door……(Katie was having none of it.)……and………

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 ………there were three of me reflected in mirror panels.

(Why do I need to hold my tongue a special way when I am taking photographs?)

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 The final stage of the journey was the Vaughan cemetery where George Rogers is buried.

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 There were the star flowers representing an interstellar cloud of water vapour floating in space. A plaque invited visitors to take a flower and plant it on a grave…..figuratively dispersing the cloud throughout the cemetery, and symbolising renewal of the water cycle.

It was quite moving seeing the flowers in the cloud and on the graves dancing in the breeze.

I suspect I was moved for reasons quite unrelated to Jessie Stanley’s motive for creating this installation. But that is the thing about art, we are free to respond in our own ways to an art work.

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Jessie Stanley wanted her art works to take the audience on a journey to discover a universal story about life-cycle, heritage, and legacy.

I am sure Jessie Stanley succeeded in this aim with the people who took the time to make the journey.

In addition to the Festival Program, I have quoted from the written information provided at the paper folding workshop.