Mica Grange in Bloom

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This is the second post featuring my visit to Mica Grange on the 9th of November 2014.

As I mentioned in my first post, the experience of visiting this garden in spring was different to the autumn visit as there were many more flowers.

Hardy proteas are a feature of the garden and they were in all their flowering glory.

 

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In addition to the proteas, callistemons, an Australian native, were putting on a show.

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And there were plenty of roses to admire as well.

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6 Responses

  1. My, what gorgeous specimens! Such lovely splashes of both soft and bold color!

    • Hi Lori, Yes, it was a delight to see the garden in bloom. I don’t think I had seen a white protea before.The white flowers were particularly showy.

  2. We have a large protea that just keeps flowering year round here Margaret. We also have a couple of different callistemons on the property and lots of roses (when the possums don’t eat their fill 😉 ). I love the look of this place and it seems to be constantly changing with the magnificent art installations that they embellish their gardens with. What a magnificent way for these artists to showcase their amazing talents and thanks for sharing it with us 🙂

    • Hi Fran, Proteas make wonderful cut flowers. I used to buy bunches of proteas from a stall holder at the Kallista market in the Dandenong Ranges. The flowers lasted for days/weeks – great value. Sometimes waratahs were included in the bunches as they could be grown in the Dandenongs. I don’t expect to see waratahs in any gardens around here.

  3. Proteas are such beautiful flowers. I’ve tried to grow them in various locations without any success. The soil has always had too much clay in it and not had good enough drainage I think. These are lovely shots. Thank you for sharing them. Proteas have always been one of my favourite flowers and I particularly like the pale pink one.

    • Jane, These proteas are growing in shallow granite gravel adjacent to granite boulders so drainage would be excellent. They would be enduring low rain fall and baking sun in summer, hot, drying winds or chill winds depending on the season.

      So given the right growing conditions, they are clearly great survivors. How frustrating not to be able to grow them yourself.

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