Crimson Glow

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Beautiful crimson callistemons decorated the tables at Newstead Community Lunch recently.

Callistemons which are native to Australia, are popular in gardens, parks and street plantings. They range in size from shrubs to small trees. Some callistemons have a weeping habit. The distinctive bottlebrush flowers are usually variations of red, scarlet or crimson but other colours including cream, pink and green are available. These hardy plants will tolerate a variety of conditions from the banks of creeks to the parched streets of Central Victoria.

With the added bonus of attracting honey eaters and bees when in flower, callistemons are winners.

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6 Responses

  1. Lovely sketch, Margaret. I have a real fondness for red callistemons. They were a feature of most gardens I’ve had and are such hardy plants. I love to watch the variety of birds which come to feed on their nectar or the insects that the flowers attract. “Bottle brushes” are a reminder of my childhood as well. The flowers fsacinated me and we would often pull them off and make decorations on the ground with them or add them to our pretend pot of soup we were making. The simple “toys” we had then! 🙂

    • I am glad you like the drawing, Jane. Thank you for sharing the childhood memories relating to bottlebrushes and your creative use of the flowers.

  2. I keep recognising Tasmanian names in your blog posts Margaret. Newstead is a suburb of Launceston :). We have a lovely red callistemon flowering inside the inner sanctum here at Serendipity Farm. It has survived being fenced off this year and Earls most unwanted attentions. For whatever reason, he loves to tunnel into the grevilleas that surround it and thrash around underneath the mass making it all move around alarmingly. My guess is that lizards are benefiting from his lack of space under the vegetation but I really don’t want to know! ;). Did you draw that beautiful selection of bottle brushes? If you did they are absolutely gorgeous. If you didn’t, they are still gorgeous but not as worthy of my praise ;).

    • Hi Fran, I checked the postcode book and there is also a ‘Newstead’ in Queensland. What was special about ‘Newstead’ that there needed to be three in Australia? Our forebears’ habit of giving the same place name to more than one location has, of course, led to postal mayhem from time to time.

      I too have lizard hunters in the household. Katie and Belle are spending many happy times in my small backyard trying to extract skinks from their hiding places. The skinks are winning.

      Yes, I drew the bottlebrushes. I am glad you like the drawing.

      • I once had a letter to my mum sent to “Denmark the country” not “Denmark the small country town in Western Australia”. Rather than the 400km trip it was supposed to have it ended up going around the world! She ended up getting it months later but what a trip that letter had! Your drawing is detailed and very beautiful. I admire people who can draw. Everything that I draw looks like badly drawn stick insects ;).

  3. Fran, Email takes all the adventure out sending letters!

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